AD4 - Colusa, Solano, Lake, Sonoma, Napa & Yolo Counties

What are Assembly District Delegates?

Every two years, the CA Democrats elect 7 women and 7 men from each Assembly District in CA as delegates to the state party. Those who are elected will have a chance to vote for the new party chair and other leadership. The race is hotly contested and will determine how welcoming, grassroots-focused and innovative the party becomes or how beholden it will remain to big money interests.

Delegates elect Party officers, endorse candidates for statewide, legislative and congressional office, attend the annual convention, network with other Democrats, represent your constituency, promote the California Democratic Party agenda, and vote to endorse resolutions and ballot measures.

You get 14 votes for delegates, 1 of which you must also vote for Executive Board Representative.

Voting Time & Location #1

Date: Sunday, January 8
Candidate Speeches Begin: 
1:00pm
Registration & Voting Begin: 
1:30pm-3:30pm
Counting of Ballots Begin: 3:30pm

Location:

Mary Stephens Library (Davis)
315 E 14th Street
Davis, CA 95618

Cross streets: B Street

*Any registered Democrat living in the district is eligible to vote. On-site voter registration is available for those not registered as Democrats.

Voting Time & Location #2

Date: Sunday, January 8
Candidate Speeches Begin: 
1:00pm
Registration & Voting Begin: 
1:30pm-3:30pm
Counting of Ballots Begin: 3:30pm

Location:

IBEW Local 180
720-B Technology Way
Napa, CA 94558

Cross Street: Off of Gateway Drive

*Any registered Democrat living in the district is eligible to vote. On-site voter registration is available for those not registered as Democrats.

Your Progressive Candidates

Melissa Johnson-Camacho

Registered Nurse / Bernie Delegate

Desirée Rojas

A Progressive for Assembly District 4

Natalie Higley

Bernie Sanders Delegate

Greg Adams

A Progressive for ADEM Assembly District 4

Christopher Myers
Christopher Myers

Disability Rights Activist

Karen McNair
Karen McNair

RN

K. Kevyne Baar
K. Kevyne Baar

Historian/Activist

Sean Raycraft

Shop Steward

Ava Kennedy

Bernie Delegate DNC Convention

Kristal Edwards-Jones
Kristal Edwards-Jones

Progressive and Information Analyst

Detailed Information

Melissa Johnson-Camacho

I’ve been an Oncology nurse for almost ten years. I have been on the frontline of the most frightening experience in someone’s life: battling cancer. My platform will be echoing the struggles of our community and our country: Healthcare for all, protecting Medicare, economic justice, climate protection, racial justice, and marriage equality.

I know poverty. I was born to a teenage single mother. For certain, we struggled and my mother was the first in our family to go to college. When I found myself a single mother, I was dependent on a safety net that was both a blessing and a curse and more importantly, humbling. Through my drive and dedication, I overcame the obstacles to become a nurse. I am thankful every day for the hand up (not hand out) that I utilized.

While a single mother I began involvement with an advocacy group for low income parents. I met other parents like me. We began to go to the capital to be a face and a voice for the families like ours. My first glimpse at the phenomenon of Truth to Power. Now I am in a job where I advocate every day. Not for just people in low income situations but for those fighting for their lives. The natural progression is here and now, to stand up for the people as a delegate for California Assembly District 4.

My additional advocacy experience extends into my work through the California Nurses Association. I am part of the Joint Nursing Practice Commission and a Nurse Representative for UCDavis Medical Center. As nurses, we advocate for our community and our profession as we understand all to well first hand how these two are intertwined.

Melissa Johnson-Camacho Flyer (3)

Desirée Rojas

I come with experience as a progressive candidate. I once served on Placer County Central Committee, and now seek to be elected as Democratic delegate in my district. I am now a member of California State Employee Association (CSEA member), along with serving as Chairperson of the Women’s committee for LCLAA-Sacramento Chapter, and an organizer on the Driscoll Boycott for California.

I come from a long history of organizing and protecting labor rights, human rights, women rights, and civil rights for farmworkers, people of color, women, and the disadvantaged. At age 6, I began organizing in the fields of Yolo County registering farmworkers to join the UFW and join the tomato strike. My labor organizing extends to being elected as president of Labor Council for Latin American Advancement-Sacramento Chapter, AFL-CIO for 4 years.

I also was a member of SEIU Local 1000 for more than 15 years. I also organized on the Bernie Sanders campaign and was area captain for Yolo County, Woodland, Cal. I served on the PTA executive board as vice president for my son’s jr. high school in my district for 3 years, where I chaired the fundraising committee, and sat on the classroom grant committee. The time is now to advocate for the hardcore issues: Immigration reform, supporting DACA, end police brutality, defend renters rights, enforcing the taxation of the 1%, reinstating Glass-Steagall Act, end fracking, and oil pipelines as means of oil transport, and open the door to more people of color inside the Democratic party, build stronger unions, run progressive slates, support unions/labor, support the San Quintin farmworkers of Baja Ca., Mexico, and Black Lives Matter.

We must end ICE Raids now and stop separating families in support of private prisons and support a humane immigration reform. I do not support NAFTA and oppose Guest Worker programs. As a Native American woman and of Mexican decent, I can tell you that I am not afraid of President Elect Trump. Racism has surfaced again with its same hateful face now in 2016; fueled by Donald Trump. I am feeling the BURN to defeat the Trump-Republican agenda of its planed attack on the poor, middle class, education, women, family healthcare, labor, immigration reform, environment, and of course-our SACRED WATER – I stand with Standing Rock who are protecting the water against Corporate Oil. Today we need to unite and strengthen our party. Please consider voting for me, as I will do my best to defend the needs of the people, and now seek to be elected as Democratic delegate in my district.

Natalie Higley

Hi, my name is Natalie Higley and I’m one of the Millennials that Senator Bernie Sanders brought into this Party during the primary. In 2011 when I turned 18, I registered to vote as a Democrat. I wasn’t inspired to become politically active until I heard about Bernie’s campaign in 2015. It was his stances on the issues and his impeccable history of fighting for what was right for the American people that drew me to his campaign. I became a Phone Banking Organizer, a Canvassing Director, a Steering Committee member for our local Bernie Office, a Super Volunteer, I organized large scale events for our area, attended multiple rallies, and I ran and was elected as one of his delegates to the Democratic National Convention. We were also able to help secure a win for Bernie during the primary in our county. I truly believe our activism and campaigning made a difference.

Like so many others, I was upset and deeply discouraged by the treatment Bernies campaign, his supporters, and his delegates received during the primaries. However, I realized that it was the idea of having Single-payer healthcare and getting money out of Politics, the possibility of tuition-free public colleges and raising the minimum wage to a livable wage of $15 an hour – these are the causes that inspired me most to get involved. It was those causes that I wanted to continue fight for.

The late Paul Wellstone said, “If we don’t fight hard enough for the things we stand for, at some point we have to recognize that we don’t really stand for them.”
I’m running to be an Assembly District Delegate because I want to see the Democratic Party fight for these causes. I want to see the Democratic Party truly become the party of the people, and I don’t believe that will just happen on its own. I believe that we will have to stand together and fight for it.

Greg Adams

I am member of Our Revolution, the Cadem Progressive, Veterans, Disabilities Caucuses, Progressive Democrats of America, ACLU, DFA, Courage to Change, Union of Concerned Scientists, Vice Chair of the Yolo County Progressives and Sanders Pledged Delegate 2016 to Democratic National Convention in Philly. I was also a Canvassing Captain for Bernie Sanders in the spring. Canvassing nearly 12 hours a day, seven days a week in Woodland for two and a half months before the primary in addition to spending several months previously to this online spreading the word. I was librarian for Occupy Sacramento and was arrested. Marched for the fight for $15 in Sacramento and Oakland. I have a BA from UCD in Anthropology, I am a Disabled Veteran and a former AFL/CIO Union member. I am a parent and a grandparent that would like to leave a better world for my grandchildren. No War, No Nukes, No Hate, No Harm.

Christopher Myers
Christopher Myers

This past year has revealed many communities on the fringes of the political divide have felt left behind and forgotten. These are communities that may share similar ideologies with the Democratic party but for one reason or another, have not felt compelled to support it. Defaulting to traditional supporters every time an election comes around is no longer enough. It is time to renew a commitment to reaching out to those communities. It is time to give them equal opportunities that empower them to participate in the democratic process rather than having someone else advocate on their behalf.

As a deaf person, I am on familiar terms with the pain of feeling excluded. I have faced the obstacles present in participating in the democratic process. I have experienced how well-intended but misguided policies regarding education, labor, transportation, healthcare, justice, and the environment have failed people with disabilities. As a son of a single mother, I appreciate the immense strength women possess despite the failures of the system to ensure equal rights and treatment. I have seen the fatigue that single parents struggle to hide from their kids. I have witnessed how the reckless practices of big banks resulted in millions of people losing their homes and livelihoods, including our own. As a grandchild, I have watched my grandparents struggle to remain independent as their minds and bodies fail and costs grow more than their retirement funds can cover. I have supported my aunt and uncle as they struggle to balance taking care of themselves, their families, and their parents at the same time.

As a first generation Asian-American graduate of UC Davis, I have benefited from affirmative action despite the odds against me. I have realized the importance of a university environment that fosters diversity and teaches the struggles of people whose identities differ from my own. This is my background to give voters an idea of what will influence my endorsements if elected as a delegate of Assembly District 4. I will advocate for and endorse resolutions, bills, and candidates that sway and support fringe communities and more importantly, enable and empower them to participate beyond the elections. I will also stay true to the core values of the Democratic party while pushing the boundaries of what it means to be progressive. Thank you very much for your consideration.

Karen McNair
Karen McNair

I’m a RN who has watched the corporate take over of healthcare since 1975 and I’m really tired of “profit before patients” and seeing patients suffer because of it! I want to work as hard as I can for progressive change in our country!

K. Kevyne Baar
K. Kevyne Baar

I was born in 1946, in Los Angeles, California. Family values made me a lifelong Democrat and union activist, proud to be called a progressive. At age 10, I ran around the schoolyard loudly proclaiming, “Stevenson/Kefauver!” When I entered the seventh grade, I asked to take woodshop, and was told, “Oh, no, little girls don’t do that.

At 17, I was considered the class historian. When John Kennedy was assassinated just months before my high school graduation, I was the one asked what I thought about Lyndon Johnson. I gave him good marks, and watched as his “Great Society” brought us, among other things, the Voting Rights Act, Medicare, and the War on Poverty. That was over 50 years ago, and here we are, fighting for all of it all over again.

My first vote for President was Hubert Humphrey. My first passionate vote for President was George McGovern. Living in New York City, that the historian by temperament became the historian by trade. I received my PhD at the young age of 60, and began to teach. One of my signature classes was “Civil Rights and Civil Wrongs, the Fight for Equality in the United States.” First I taught it as an honors’ seminar for undergraduates at New York University, then at Hacettepe University in Ankara, Turkey on a Fulbright Award, and finally as a freshman seminar, again at NYU. As each semester ended, I apologized to the students. I told them that many of us believed we had made a permanent difference in race relations and women’s rights. Sadly, I was forced to plead with them to be ever vigilant; what we fought so hard for could easily slip away. Fortunately in them I found young people who are extraordinary, and up to the fight that lies ahead. I also feel that with the slate I have the privilege of being a part of.

All of this brings us to the present. Many thought that when the dust of November 8th cleared, the Republican Party was going to have the task of reorganizing and regenerating their party. But here we are instead, the Democratic Party, looking to figure out what comes next. The most difficult part for me right now is having to live so many of these issues yet again. I hoped that once was more than enough; but here we go back into the fray. I am running to be a delegate because I want to be part of the process that brings our better angels back.

Sean Raycraft

One of the stated goals of the Sanders 2016 campaign was to bring millions of people into the political process. He wanted young people, working people, and people from all walks of life to work within the Democratic Party to build a united, more inclusive and progressive America. I am running to answer that call. My name is Sean Raycraft, and I have been a grass roots activist for many years now. I work at a grocery store in Davis, where I also serve as Union Shop Steward. Together, with many other progressive activists, have been fighting for a more just and equitable community.

I was Co-Chair of the Raise the Wage Davis campaign, I fought the Walmart agenda by organizing Walmart workers to in direct action to protest poverty wages, poor working conditions, terrible sick time policies, retaliation, and unfair scheduling practices. I was part of a network of grassroots organizers who helped generate pressure to pass AB 1522, the law that allows all California workers 3 days of annual sick time. I have also fought slum lords in Davis, the mini dorm owners, and advocated for fair treatment of renters in Davis. Students and the working poor are constantly exploited in a market with a 0.2% vacancy rate. Recently, I spent the summer advocating for farm workers, the UFW and racial justice. I helped organize grass roots support for AB 1066, overtime for farm workers in our district. As part of my job, I work with produce every day, I thought it was only fair that the people who pick that produce get the same OT protections that I do.

I consider myself a feminist, an ally of the LGBTQIA community, and someone who is committed to racial justice in America today. Often, I write Op-Eds for the Davis Vanguard, where I cover issues surrounding Organized Labor, racial justice, poverty, and the housing shortage. I worked on Brett Lee’s successful campaign in 2016, where he set a record for votes earned in a Davis city council race. In my opinion, there are three defining issues of our time. Income inequality, fighting the Trump agenda and climate change. All three issues are connected, and as Democrats, united with these common interests can lay the foundation for a more just and equitable society, on a greener planet. I always tell people that if they want to complain about the way things are in the world, they ought to have the courage to do something about it. Please come out and vote for our progressive slate on January 8!

Ava Kennedy

A Democrat since high school, I canvassed for Eugene McCarthy and protested the Vietnam war. I ran for US Congress in Oklahoma in 1996. In 2016, I served as a California delegate to the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia and campaigned hard for progressive causes. I’m ready to bring the Democratic Party back to the people by getting money out of politics, eliminating super delegates, and standing for honest and transparent practices in our Party.
I favor a $15 minimum wage, health care and free public college tuition for all, and prioritizing alternative energy.
I’m opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline and fossil fuel use in general.

I strongly oppose interventionist wars for profit.

I believe the Democratic Party needs to fully embrace the needs of the average American rather than corporations and the elite.

I consider myself a feminist, an ally of the LGBTQIA community, and someone who is committed to racial justice in America today. Often, I write Op-Eds for the Davis Vanguard, where I cover issues surrounding Organized Labor, racial justice, poverty, and the housing shortage. I worked on Brett Lee’s successful campaign in 2016, where he set a record for votes earned in a Davis city council race. In my opinion, there are three defining issues of our time. Income inequality, fighting the Trump agenda and climate change. All three issues are connected, and as Democrats, united with these common interests can lay the foundation for a more just and equitable society, on a greener planet. I always tell people that if they want to complain about the way things are in the world, they ought to have the courage to do something about it. Please come out and vote for our progressive slate on January 8!

Kristal Edwards-Jones
Kristal Edwards-Jones

My name is Kristal Edwards-Jones and I ask for your vote to serve as a delegate for District Assembly 4.

BACKGROUND— I was born in California. My grandparents were mixed-race, agricultural migrants from Oklahoma, whose ancestry included freedmen, Sauk Fox, and Choctaw; my forebears were socially inclusive of all people. I am also one generation away from farm laborers; I was the first to gain a graduate degree. My mother and her nine siblings worked the fields of the San Joaquin Valley in the 1950s-60s. I grew up a typical youth of the San Joaquin Valley, studying agriculture and science in high school. I gradually developed a strong interest in sustainable agriculture, local environmental stewardship and the fair treatment of agricultural workers. I went onto work in the natural foods industry and libraries, and later, I became a stay-at-home mom.

I am now an Information Scientist. Having gained Master’s degrees in both History and Library/Information Science, my academic background includes History (economic, labor, immigration, slavery, tribal communities and Mexican women pioneers) and Community Studies (the theory and practice of social change).

QUALIFICATIONS and EXPERIENCE— For over 20 years, I have volunteered as a grassroots/community organizer and fundraiser, providing administrative and marketing support for a wide range of community service organizations. These organizations represented people of different economic and social backgrounds in areas of healthcare, immigration reform, workers’ rights and ending violence against women. As a UC graduate student, I participated in the system-wide effort, even walking the picket-line, to achieve a labor contract for academic student employees and form the UC Student-Workers Union, UAW Local 2865.

At present, I am a proud, rank-and-file member of SEIU. My professional work is focused on data and information ethics, organizational intelligence and learning, and reducing the digital divide between well-off and struggling communities to empower economic and social participation. My sustained interest in agriculture also includes advocating for food security, sustainable agriculture, and community gardens. I bring extensive problem-solving skills enabling me to identify institutional blocks and to swiftly formulate and implement strategic plans for change. During the primary season, I organized information tables and forums for campaign volunteers. I also served as Deputy Convener for the Congressional District 3 Delegate caucus, May 1, 2016.

GOALS— These are the party goals that many voters expressed to me: Overturn Citizen’s United (a corporation is not a person); Re-instate Glass-Steagall and end “Too Big to Fail” economic policies; Invest in schools and public transportation systems; Expand efficient, renewable and sustainable energy; Increase wages for workers and establish equal pay for women; Support the fair and equal treatment of LGBT and immigrant communities and communities of color; Transition out of employer-based healthcare and unleash the collective-bargaining power of all California residents for lower drug prices and health care costs; and reinvigorate the Democratic Party.

We can move forward and evolve the organizational culture and identity of the Party or continue party politics as usual and experience the same results. I am inspired by Fannie Lou Hamer who organized for the political inclusion of African Americans in Mississippi in the Democratic Party of the 1960s. During the recent presidential campaign, I witnessed the emergence of a sizable contingent of high-information Democratic voters who can bring new energy and reinvigorate the Democratic Party. Independent voters and grass-roots organizers energized and revolutionized the CA primary as well as supported outreach efforts and participated in other states’ primaries. As with Fannie Lou Hamer, the time has come once again for the Democratic Party to expand its tent to include newer and younger participants. All of this is a no-brainer. Let’s promote true inclusion, grassroots activism, and a dynamic broadening of community participation within the Democratic Party.

“If we keep doing what we’re doing, we’re going to keep getting what we’re getting.” —Stephen R. Covey